The Value of Life: Serial vs Mass Killer Perspective

In My last essay, written and published yesterday, I dissected the issue of whether or not illegal serial murder inside of the diseased and deranged society of amerikkka is on the decline. If you have not already read this latest work of uniquely Superior personal insight, I strongly suggest that you do:

https://forbiddentruthblog.com/2015/10/20/serial-killing-in-decline-a-forbidden-truth-analysis/

Upon multiple rereadings of My essay, and you can be certain that I always spend time savoring the reflection of My own expressed brilliance, I realized that I omitted a small but significant point which supports My overall conclusion on the question at hand, and also provides proper perspective on an ideological difference between serial and mass murder.

Instead of adding a note to the original essay, I have decided to compose a much shorter but completely independent essay, because the specific point is certainly worthy of additional, thoughtful mind reflection.

The new question at hand is this: How do serial and mass killers differ in terms of the value they place upon the lives of others, as expressed via their operational methodology?? The typical human, blind hypocrite that he is, denying the Forbidden Truth that he is personally guilty and responsible for directly sponsoring and causing both serial and mass murder on a genocidal scale, will decree that serial and mass murderes place no value upon the lives of their chosen victims. This is utterly absurd to any sane thinker!

Of course the serial and mass murderer place value upon the lives of their targeted victims. The personal choice to carry out these acts, to terminate the existence of others, expresses a philosophical perspective, consciously realized or not, that life itself possesses value. Directly ending the lives of others, constitutes the theft of something valuable, and this theft is one of the impositional nodes which provides cathartic pleasure and satisfaction to the harvester.

So, in examining the relative value placed upon the lives of his victims by a serial killer, versus a mass murderer, it is clearly apparent that the serial killer places a relatively higher value upon the lives of his targets. Consider: The serial killer specifically singles out and targets a single victim, or in a few cases a small group of victims. He pre-selects this singular victim, often stalking and shadowing the victim in advance. He spends time, attention, and focus in carefully selecting a specific victim, and he directly endangers his own safety and very existence, for the benefit of claiming only a single victim.

All of this chosen methodology on an ideological and behavioral perspective, speaks to the placement of a relatively high degree of value upon the life of his chosen victims, by the serial killer. You could even say that he places the life of his victim on an equal par to his own life, since he is directly risking his own life for the psychological benefit of terminating only one other life. Yes, he is hoping and planning to harvest many more, but as functional reality, he is directly endangering himself for the aspirational payoff of killing just one individual.

Now, let us compare and contrast this typical perspective of the serial killer, to the typical perspective of the mass murderer. The typical mass murderer specifically seeks to maximize his victim count, the total number of harvestees. While he may take great care in choosing his venue, he typically does not spend much time or effort trying to pre-select specific individual victims by stalking. He is usually willing to endanger and sacrifice his own existence in order to achieve his reflective catharsis, but only for the potential and targeted payoff of harvesting a significant number of humans, not simply one human.

So, any rational comparison between the two methodologies reveals a difference in psychological mindset between the serial and mass killer. Relatively speaking, the serial killer devalues his own existence, while placing greater value upon the existence of his targeted victims, while the mass murderer exalts his own existence, placing lesser value upon the existence of his targeted victims.

The Forbidden Truth regarding the value of life is this: Society bestows absolutely no value upon the safety, well-being, personal protection, or mortal existence of any human being. Everyone born human is decreed to be a worthless piece of owned property, to be exploited, drained dry, and discarded to the void of eternal nothingness. Both the serial and the mass murderer reflect this Truth, to varying degrees, in their decisions to annihilate others, in reflection of their own physical and psychological annihilation.

The pointlessness, meaninglessness, and hopelessness of the individual life path journey, is both experienced and expressed by the serial and by the mass murderer. But still, there is a difference between the killer who carefully targets one victim, and the killer who depersonalizes all of humanity, who will not accept a one-on-one targeting, who recognizes a one-on-one targeting as a betrayal of his own Self-value.

The Superior knows he is more than one. He is All, he is Everything, his contempt for others will not allow him to sacrifice the universe of Self, for a singular one.

And so if you reread My original essay, you will find that the insights of Forbidden Truth I reveal here, support My concluding premise, that mass murder within amerikkka is on the increase, while serial killing is more than likely in decline, as the absurd and false delusions of hope, optimism, and the viability of a “future”, are more frequently being recognized as propaganized mind control, by tortured victim-creations living out the endgame of a society in the death throes of devolution.

bundy1

All Text is Copyright © 2014-2064 The Seer of Forbidden Truth. All Rights Reserved.

4 comments

  1. Serial killers are more calculating, as they plan out minute details on how they are going to capture and kill their victims. You make a great analogy in comparing and contrasting a serial killer and a mass murderer ideals.

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  2. I would like to say also, that I LOVE both serial and mass killers. I’m so happy that both exist.

    It’s hard to decide which I like more. It’s like choosing between chocolate ice cream or vanilla. 🙂

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    1. As we are aware, unlike most humans, serial killers and mass murderers are victims fighting back. It’s ironic that most can’t seem to comprehend this and tend to view these beings as “evil” deserving punishment

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  3. These last two essays were very interesting, particularly the previous one.

    I think that serial killers place more value on their own lives than mass murderers do. Unlike mass murderers, serial killers do not intend to be caught. In general they do everything they can to avoid capture/punishment/death. Their choice to kill one person at a time only reflects their higher degree of self value. The reason for this being that it is virtually impossible to get away with mass murder. Killing one person at a time is an unfortunate tactical necessity, and I am sure that if potential serial killers somehow knew they would be caught for killing only one victim, most would choose not to as it is not worth it.

    Additionally I believe that most serial killers would leap gleefully at the opportunity to commit a mass murder, or even multiple mass murders, if they believed that they could get away with it.

    The serial killer is gambling with his life and safety, he is taking a risk, but he still intends and plans to survive and evade capture/harm. The mass murder is making a conscious, definite choice to throw his life and safety away, with no possibility of escape. He intends, plans, chooses to be captured and/or killed by authorities.

    This, in my view, exalts the serial killer above the mass murderer in terms of self love and self value.

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